Holiday Snacktivity Ideas

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holiday-themed-craft-ideas-cookies-baking-kidsBaking with kids is a wonderful way to incorporate a lot of skills into one session. Of course, most speech and language classrooms are not able to accommodate baking. Because of this, you have to be a little more creative to incorporate a snack and project all in one. If you are in a location where you have a kitchen, break sessions into steps and work on it over time. If not, the following alternatives are fun ways to get kids actively involved in the process. Always check on food allergies and other food sensitivities before trying these with children.

Decorating Individual Sugar Cone Trees

An easy and edible project for younger children involves making Christmas trees out of sugar ice cream cones. To do this, you will need a package of sugar cones, vanilla frosting, green food coloring, plastic knives, and an assortment of candy. Prepare the vanilla frosting ahead of time so that it looks like evergreen tree color. Give each child a plate with some frosting and a cone and ask them to frost it so it looks like a tree. Place a little frosting on the round part to secure it to the plate. When the trees are complete, it is time to make them festive. Use different candy items, sprinkles, chocolate chips, and other items that the kids will like. Another winter touch is to add coconut flakes to look like snow.

Festive Style Gingerbread Houses

Many holiday tales talk about gingerbread people and candy houses. Kids can create their own small versions while practicing turn taking, sequential directions, and asking questions. You will need to have graham crackers, white frosting, plastic bags for use to pipe frosting, plastic knives, and different types of candy for decorations.

Be sure to look over how to cut the pieces of graham cracker like shown on the Graham Cracker Gingerbread House Tutorial. It will be easier to do this ahead of time. These may be placed into baggies to distribute to each child during speech time. Model how to construct the house. Allow time for individuals to repeat the instructions, ask questions, and talk through how they are decorating their gingerbread house masterpiece.

Both of these may be extended by making a holiday card to go with them. Kids can draw what the inside of their gingerbread house looks like, or the presents that would be under their sugar cone tree. This may then be taken home for them to share with families. If time is limited, the treats may need to go home before they can be eaten. Pack up the items and send home a sheet of instructions for families to be able to try this again.

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