Let’s Go Fly a Kite: Speech and Language Activities

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summer-speech-language-activity-ideasWhile the weather is still nice, take advantage of an outdoor activity that will inspire additional tie-ins for speech and language goals. Bring in a kite to share with students. Remember that many may be unfamiliar with kites and how to fly them.

Take time to open up the kite and look at the different parts. Practice asking and answering questions to find out what each child knows about them. If you have access to a DVD, share the song from Mary Poppins where they fly kites. Choo Choo Soul has made a new video of Let’s Go Fly a Kite for Disney Junior that would be a nice addition for a sing along.

Next, take your groups outside to experiment with the kites. Have them try to get the kites into the air and explain how it is done. This will allow them to practice sequence, following steps, and oral language skills.

Synonym Kites

Prepare some kite cards ahead of time. Laminate them and write synonyms onto each of the kites. Make each of the kites different or all the same. You do not want the synonym cards to match and make the exercise too each. Play a memory like game together. When kids identify a matching pair they need to use the words in a sentence. Focus on building vocabulary and how synonyms are able to be used to replace the same word being overused.

Sky’s the Limit Kites

Alison’s Speech Peeps has a craftivity that is able to be downloaded. The kite activity can be used to focus on a wide variety of items. The words could be changed on the printable for any speech and language goals. If you are working on descriptive words, the diamond of the kite could have the word. The bows on the kite string would have additional vocabulary words that refer to the original.

The kite could also focus on a start or end sounds. A kite with |Fl| could include bows with flower, floor, fly, and other words. As Alison notes, this activity can easily be changed up to focus on other items including articulation. For multilingual students, use the back of the kites for word translations that will be helpful when they go home.

When finished decorating the kites, send them home so they can be used for speech practice. Send home a sheet explaining what each child is focusing on and ways that families can assist. For those that want to make their own kite, include directions so they may explore and try the activity at home.

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