Luck of the Irish on St. Patrick’s Day

No Gravatar

st-patricks-day-speech-activityEveryone is a little Irish on St. Patrick’s, Day thanks to all of the fun surrounding the holiday. Everyone has fun saying “top o’ the morning” and wearing green to celebrate. Festivities throughout many communities allow people to embrace another culture. Speech therapy is the perfect time to spread the luck of the Irish to share with crafts, books, songs, and other engaging activities.

Lucky Little Stories

Not all children will be familiar with St. Patrick’s Day. Take time to share a tale of the Irish holiday with kids during a session. The stories range from topics of holiday history, luck, friendship, and silly song adaptations. Some popular book titles include:

  • Hooray for St. Patrick’s Day – by Joan Holub
  • Ten Lucky Leprechauns – by Kathryn Heling
  • Green Shamrocks – by Eve Bunting
  • Fiona’s Luck – by Teresa Bateman
  • The Night Before St. Patrick’s Day – by Natasha Wing
  • The Luck of the Irish – by Margaret McNamara
  • Patrick’s Day – by Gail Gibbons

Check with teachers and librarians to see what books they may have. More books are always being published and may work better than others for the goals you are working on. Book walks are a great first step. Take time to see what everyone has for prior knowledge on the subject of St. Patrick’s Day.

Let’s Trap a Leprechaun

Leprechauns love to cause mischief this time of year. During a session, challenge kids to make a leprechaun trap to catch the pesky little guys. Of course, trapping leprechauns is tricky. Thanks to this, kids will need to be creative and think outside of the box. Connect with families at home and explain what you will be doing with their children. Ask them to send a shoe box into school so you can use it to create your trap. As always, include information about the holiday for multilingual families that may not be as familiar with the fun.

With the boxes in front of you, have kids brainstorm about what items will help to catch the elusive Irish fellow. Do they think they would like shamrocks, rainbows, gold, or something else? Have everyone talk through their plan and then let them use a variety of items to decorate their leprechaun traps. When the traps are finished, share how the trap will work and get the leprechaun. If you have students for multiple days, leave their trap out and when they return have it filled with gold coins that have practice items on them. Once finished, this may go home and the playful nature will inspire children to share with their families.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Click here to view the latest job opportunities we offer at Bilingual Therapies.

0
Posted in: Assessment Resources Tags: ,

Comments are closed.