Using Slime As A Speech Therapy Tool

making slimeCraft stores and more have displays set up all about how to create slime of different colors, textures, and more. Slime is a popular toy for kids but it can also serve as a great therapeutic resource as well. The best part about slime is that it is extremely easy to make with kids during a session. Slime is flexible and can be made inside or outside with little or no space required. The ease of creating slime makes it an ideal tool to incorporate into therapy sessions.  Read More »

Top 5 Tools for SLPs

sensory activitiesWorking with students on their speech and language goals, evaluating them, and keeping lines of communication open with families can be challenging. Thanks to technology, we have a lot of resources available to help us with our daily tasks. Using these tools will help to maximize time, balance work, and keep things fresh within your sessions. Read More »

Tips for Communicating with Parents When You Don’t Speak Their Language

Communicating a child’s success and needs in therapy with parents is one of the most important things clinicians do. It truly is a team effort to generalize successful outcomes from the therapy room and carry them over into the home. This can be complicated when you do not share a language in common with parents. In many schools throughout the country, there can be dozens of different languages spoken in the homes of students and finding ways to help parents access and share information is crucial for continued success. Read More »

Top 4 Resources to Help SLPs that Work With Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations

More than 21 percent of the U.S. population—or 60.3 million people—speak a language other than English at home, according to figures from the U.S. Census Bureau, and those figures continue to rise. As a result, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in the United States are seeing increasing numbers of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) clients. The large majority of SLPs practicing in the United States speak only one language, English, and almost all see clients who speak a language other than English or come from a culture that is different from their own, according to a research report published in Clinical Archives of Communication Disorders(CACD). Even bilingual SLPs often encounter students with different language or cultural backgrounds from their own when working in areas with culturally diverse populations.
Read More »

6 Summer Activities for School SLPs

Summer is a wonderful opportunity for School Speech Language Pathologists to rest and recharge from the school year. Not only does it provide School SLPs with time to take a break, it is also a great chance to focus on career advancement whether that is continuing education, planning for the upcoming school year or looking for a new job position. From self-care ideas to continuing education, read below for 6 summer activity ideas for School SLPs. Read More »

How Bilingual SLPs Can Support Children During the Silent Period

Learning a second language is a complex process, especially for a child. Second language acquisition is also very individualized. Many factors can affect how a child learns another language, including his or her family experiences, culture and literacy level. As the number of bilingual children grows, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) must learn to differentiate between a language disorder and typical second language development. There may be concerns when new English Language Learners (ELLs) are quiet or silent in the classroom.  SLPs play an important role in determining whether these students are in the “silent period” phase of second language acquisition and how to support them through the process. Read More »