Tag Archives: speech games

Talking About Feelings

talking about feelingsKids often hold in how they are feeling. It may not be because they are trying to keep a secret. Often, it is because they may not know how to express what is happening in their own minds. Now imagine being a multilingual student who is less familiar with the words other people use to describe their feelings. This can be an even more difficult time for them if they are confused, sad, or upset. Taking time to explore feelings will not only be beneficial for those students, but all who may need to take a moment to think about their own feelings. Read More »

Hop to it for Chalk Games

chalk activitiesThere is something special about using chalk with kids in the classroom and during therapy sessions. Chalk helps to actively engage children into the process and eases their fear of something being difficult. Utilizing chalk for speech and language games allows you to practice skill building for goals in a fun and inviting way. The best thing about chalk is that it's very inexpensive, and you can easily make up new games for the specific needs of each child you work with. Read More »

Copycat Games and Creations

copycat gamesBeing a "copycat" is fun for kids. It's a great way to work on modeling speech and language and allows kids to practice being more independent. While working with these activities, students will be working on their individual goals. Students can also practice each activity at home with family and friends. Read More »

Fabulous May Flower Speech Connections

Those April showers will lead to May flowers all over the place this month. Children love looking at the colors and differences in these natural beauties. Embrace the wonder and use it for activities that involve some art and fun. Read More »

Bilingual Language Development at the Zoo

Zoo Time It is rare to find a child who is not enthralled with animals. Big animals, little animals, wild animals, and domestic animals all tend to draw children out of their shells. This is why a trip to the zoo is the perfect opportunity to work on language development skills. Children are far more likely to talk about what they see and what the animals are doing than they are to spontaneously erupt into conversation in a language that is still difficult. Read More »